mayatosis

i'm addicted to fantasy

He loved her without
desperation and needs
and wants.
With his naked soul,
he loved her,
and dreamt
of her clothed
in white dancing
beneath the moonlight
as the stars
grew jealous of the way
she moved.

—Christopher Poindexter (via quotes-shape-us)

slaughterhouse90210:

“My parents are like younger, urchinlike brothers and sisters whose faces are dirty and who blurt out humiliating things that can neither be anticipated nor controlled. I sigh and make the best of it. I feel older than they are, much older. I feel ancient.”—Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye

slaughterhouse90210:

“My parents are like younger, urchinlike brothers and sisters whose faces are dirty and who blurt out humiliating things that can neither be anticipated nor controlled. I sigh and make the best of it. I feel older than they are, much older. I feel ancient.”
—Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye

bbook:

There was one scene that really killed me, and that’s the one where Ryota’s looking through the camera and realizes that his son has been photographing him while he’s sleeping. That felt so strongly to me as a recognition for the first time that someone truly loves you and wants to capture that admiration they see you with and hold onto it. And here, it was Ryota’s realization of the immense love from his son, which reminded me of in After Life when Takashi says that he realized for the first time he was a part of someone else’s happiness. 

Oh, I just noticed that now!

In After Life, he also says that he never really lets himself become vulnerable and yes, those two characters actually felt very much related for me.

Oh, that’s very interesting! However, the camera scene was really based on my actual experience. It’s something that happened to me recently, and I was taken aback by it. While I didn’t realize it, my daughter has taken these pictures and had this view of me. It was my first time encountering that view of myself, and I wanted to let it be depicted in the film as well. So it didn’t connect to After Life consciously, but when you said that it makes sense now. That sentiment in them is the same.

Hirokazu Kore-eda on His Heartbreaking New Film ‘Like Father, Like Son’

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is an unmerited privilege, a sign of that person’s socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and cosign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can self-righteously bestow DWYL as career advice to those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves — in fact, to loving ourselves — what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

Yet arduous, low-wage work is what ever more Americans do and will be doing. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the two fastest-growing occupations projected until 2020 are “Personal Care Aide” and “Home Care Aide,” with average salaries of $19,640 per year and $20,560 per year in 2010, respectively. Elevating certain types of professions to something worthy of love necessarily denigrates the labor of those who do unglamorous work that keeps society functioning, especially the crucial work of caregivers.

If DWYL denigrates or makes dangerously invisible vast swaths of labor that allow many of us to live in comfort and to do what we love, it has also caused great damage to the professions it portends to celebrate, especially those jobs existing within institutional structures. Nowhere has the DWYL mantra been more devastating to its adherents than in academia. The average PhD student of the mid 2000s forwent the easy money of finance and law (now slightly less easy) to live on a meager stipend in order to pursue their passion for Norse mythology or the history of Afro-Cuban music.

The reward for answering this higher calling is an academic employment marketplace in which around 41 percent of American faculty are adjunct professors — contract instructors who usually receive low pay, no benefits, no office, no job security, and no long-term stake in the schools where they work.

Miya Tokumitsu making important connections over at Jacobin 

(via heatherchristle)

(via heatherchristle)